Tag Archives: Inkscape

The Last Aphid: Another Charley Harper Inspired Quilt Block

The next block in my Charley Harper quilt is my rendition of the artist’s “The Last Aphid” which features four ladybugs staring down an aphid that they’ve cornered between them.  This block was a challenge because of the symmetry.  Everything has to be lined up or it looks wrong (accepting some error of course because it’s applique and it’s never going to be perfect).

LastAphid.jpg

Like the other blocks and quilt plan, I used Inkscape to design the pattern.

One tool that has helped me immensely through this block and the last was masking tape.  Yup.  Good ol’ masking tape.  It’s not to hold anything down, but rather to lift something up, namely cat hair.  My guy cat loves to get in the middle of anything I’m doing (case-in-point he’s currently sitting next to me and pushing the arrow keys as I try to type) and he’s a real big shedder.  I guess I should be glad he’s a short-hair.  Aside from just not looking that great, cat hair is a problem because it gets into the thread as I sew and causes it to snarl up into a knot more than it normally would.  To get rid of the cat hair, I stick the masking tape down on the fabric and pull it off; the cat hair comes with it.  It’s pretty much a cheap version of a lint roller.

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Inkscape for Applique Sewing Patterns

Inkscape is a vector illustration program so most people think of it as an art program for producing slick graphics.  But it’s a really useful tool for planning an preparing for other art forms.  For example, I’ve been using it for sewing.  What?  Yes, sewing.  It’s incredibly useful for drawing patterns.  Recently I’ve been working on a needle turn applique quilt based on the work of Charley Harper, but for the past few years I’ve made felt Christmas ornaments for friends and family, for all of which I used Inkscape to draw the patterns.

If you’re familiar with Inkscape already, making applique patterns will be pretty straight forward. If you’re new to the program, I highly recommend working through a couple of tutorials.  Here’s my general workflow (yours may differ):

  1. Start with an image.  On Pinterest, great projects abound, but sometimes the post links to costly instructions, or no pattern at all.  I’ve also found things that I like the look of, but are a different scale – too big or too small.  Or, as with my latest project, I’m creating my own pattern pieces from an image.  Look for images with distinct polygons of colors.  Blended or faded areas are going to be harder to duplicate with applique unless you can find fabric with the right fade or you dye your own.
  2. Put the image into an Inkscape file and resize it to the size you want your final project to be.
  3. Draw polygons around each of the colors you see in your image.  You’ll want to think about how you’ll put the whole thing together as you trace, so think about how the layers will work together.  For example, if you have polka-dots, you’ll want to place the circles on top of a larger background color, not have a section of background color with holes cut out like Swiss cheese.

    Cat_PatternMaking

    Start by tracing out all of the sections you’ll need to cut from various colors of fabric.

  4. Start a new Inkscape file and make the size of the page whatever size you plan to print.  For those in the US, you’ll probably want US Letter Size.
  5. Copy your polygons from the first file and past them into the second.  (I find keeping both files is helpful later for placement of the pieces.)  Arrange all your polygons on the page so that none overlap.  For larger projects, I’ve made several files. If the same shape shows up multiple times in your pattern, for example maybe eyes or ears, you only need to include that shape once.

    Cat_PatternPieces

    One of 3 pages of pattern pieces for a larger work with many pieces.

  6. On each piece, I like to print the color of the fabric I plan to use and how many of this piece I need to cut out.
  7. If you have a really big pattern piece that’s bigger than your printable page size, there’s a solution.  Put the big pieces into one Inkscape file, then size the page to the content, giving it a reasonable margin for your printer.  Then save the file as a PDF.  Open the PDF and in the print options, pick Poster (or similar setting).  It will divide up the pattern into printable pages.  Then you can tape the pages together before you cut out the pattern.

    Cat_BigPieces

    My printer settings have an option to print large PDFs in pieces.  Yours probably has something similar.  Super useful for printing larger pattern pieces.

Bonus! Now when you’re placing your pieces, some stuff you can just eyeball and it will be fine.  In some situations though you might need to be more precise.  Because you have your original pattern tracing in Inkscape, you can go back to that file and measure the distance between items.  I set my units to inches and draw a line, then see how long my line is.  Super simple, but very effective.

Measure

The red line measures how long the vertical eye whisker is.

See the finished piece on a previous blog post.


Limp on a Limb: Another Charley Harper Inspired Quilt Block

This second block in my Charley Harper Quilt is inspired by the piece Limp on a Limb.  If you compare the original and the block, you’ll see that I’ve made some edits.  Most notably, I have decided (for now at least) to not include the leaf pattern in the background.  Repeated shapes are a hallmark of Harper’s work, so including the pattern would be more true to the work, but in reality, it would require extensive embroidery and I’m afraid that won’t hold up long-term, especially given the light weight of the fabric I’ve chosen for the background.  That being said, the fabric I chose is mottled green and I hope it at least gives the piece some more depth.

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Example diagram from placing the cat’s eye wiskers.

For this block, I thought I would show some of the detail of how I transfer lines from the pattern to the piece.  All my patterns are digital svg files, which means I can measure the size of each object in Inkscape.  (I promise to write a post about this with more detail and hopefully convert some quilters to Inkscape quilt designers… but later.  Ok, it’s later. See the post here.)  I make measurements from a reference point, draw out a diagram, then transfer the measurements to the fabric using a chalk pencil (either white or blue depending on the color of the fabric).  Then I embroider.  It’s important to mark as little as possible on the fabric with the calk pencils, because the marks are hard to get out.

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Faint chalk pencil marks show where to embroider the eye whiskers.

When placing any object in a piece, whether it’s embroidery or a layer of fabric, I’ve found that it’s important to figure out what feature the new object needs to be inline with. For placing the eye whiskers, at first I was going to reference the corner of the eye. It seemed logical. Then I found that in the original piece, the left eye and whiskers don’t line up. What? But there’s always such precision in Harper’s work! But after some staring at the piece, I realized that the vertical line of both sets of eye whiskers intersects the point where the ear meets the head. Bingo! Now my whiskers are in the right spot.

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The finished piece.


Making of a Moon Tree Map

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I’m presenting a workflow for finishing maps in Inkscape at FOSS4G North America this year (2016). To really show the process effectively, I made a map and took screenshots along the way.

The Data

I decided to work with Moon Tree location data.  It’s quirky and interesting… and given that this is a geek conference I figured the space reference would be appreciated.  A few months ago I learned about Moon Trees watching an episode of Huell Howser on KVIE Public Television and then visited the one on the California State Capitol grounds.  I later learned from my aunt that my grandfather was a part of the telemetry crew that retrieved the Apollo 14 mission that carried the seeds that would become the Moon Trees, so there’s something of a connection to this idea.  Followers of my research also know that I’m a plant person, particularly plant geography.  So this seemed like the perfect dataset.  I was fortunate to find that Heather Archuletta had already digitized the locations of public trees and made them available in KML format.

Data Processing

The KML format is great for some applications (particularly Google maps, for which it was designed) but it poses some challenges.  I spent several hours… maybe more than I want to admit… formatting the .dbf to make the shapefile more useful for my purposes.  I created columns and standardized the content.  The map does not present all the data available (um… duh.).  It was challenge enough getting all this onto one page.

Yes, Inkscape is Necessary

You can’t make this map in QGIS completely.  I mean, normally you can make some fantastic maps in QGIS, but this one is actually not possible.  Right now, QGIS can’t handle having map frames with different projections.  I tried, but I found that even when the map composer looked right, the export in all three export options changed the projection and center of each frame to match that of the last active frame.  So I ended up with a layout with three zoom levels centered on Brazil… interesting, but not what I had in mind.  So I exported an .svg file three times from the map composer – one for each map frame – and put them together in Inkscape.

Sneaky Cartography

One of the methods I often use in my maps is to create subtle blurred halos behind text or icons that might otherwise get lost on a busy background.  I don’t like when the viewer sees the halos (maybe it’s from teaching ArcMap far too many years at universities).  It’s not quite a pet peeve, but I think there’s often better ways to handle busy backgrounds and readability.  My blog, my soapbox.  Can you spot them?  There are a couple in the map and in the final slide of the pitch video.  It doesn’t look like much, but I promise the text is easier to read.

The texture on the continents is the moon.  I clipped a photo of the moon using the continent outlines.  I liked the idea of trees on the moon.

Icons

The icons are special to me.  I’ve been really wanting to make a map using images from Phylopic and I thought this was the perfect opportunity… but… but… no one had uploaded outlines for any of the species I needed.  So I made them and uploaded them.  So if you want an .svg of these, help yourself.  If, however, you need dinosaurs, they’ve got you covered.

Watch it happen:

My pitch video captures the process from start to finish:

 Want more open source cartography?

Come to FOSS4G North America and see my and several other talks focused on cartography.  I’ll cover methods and tools in Inkscape common for cartography.


My Big Day of Giving Toolbox

ChangeTheWorld

A graphic used in the 2015 campaign.  Photo editing: XnView.  Layout & graphics: Inkscape.

I think it’s pretty clear from my blog that I’m equal parts scientist and artists.  One of the things I do on the art side is that I’m on the Board of Directors for the Pamela Trokanski Dance Theatre.  My job is twofold: (1) manage the social media outlets, and more recently (2) I am the Team Leader for our participation in the Big Day of Giving, which requires a lot of social media.  So, I’m doing a lot of graphic design, communications, advertising, and coordination. Big Day of Giving is a day (literally 24 hours) of donating to Sacramento-area nonprofit organizations that have profiles with Giving Edge.

Having a successful Big Day of Giving almost requires someone on your team to be able to film and edit videos and to create engaging graphics all of which can be posted online, added to blog articles, and be sent in emails… not to mention printed materials and press releases.  HOW do you do all of that?  Through my graphic editing and generating needs as a scientist (hello, figures in journal articles!), I’ve collected a set of go-to tools that are all FREE and open source.

Graphic Design: Inkscape

Photo Editing: Gimp or XnView

Video Editing: OpenShot

Why does free and open source matter?  Pamela Trokanksi Dance Theatre is a 501(c)3 education nonprofit.  Read: we have no money to spend on expensive art programs.  All of our operating costs are provided through donations and ticket sales.  Additionally, all of our board members (the board is a major source of volunteer hours) can download and use these programs without incurring costs.  Each of our board members already donates monetarily to the the organizations.  We, as board members, don’t want to have to spend money on software.

“But these are advanced tools!” I’ve heard people complain.  “It’s too much for volunteers to learn.”  Sigh.  All I can say is try.  It helps that two members of our board are die-hard Inkscape fans.  We set up Inkscape templates with the logos already added to make start-up easy for the novices.  So far, so good.


Batch Editing Text in Inkscape

(Sarcasm!) Thanks, R & Inkscape!  I totally wanted to mark my outliers with the letter q!

(Sarcasm!) Thanks, R & Inkscape! I totally wanted to mark my outliers with the letter q!

Have you ever opened a PDF of a graph made in R in Inkscape?  For some reason, it appears that my graphs are made with characters from the Dingbats font, which I guess Inkscape doesn’t like, so when I open the file in Inkscape, it changes all of my nice circles to the letter q.  That’s awesome.  How do you fix that?  Inkscape doesn’t let you batch change the text inside a textbox, as far as I can tell.  So, here’s one way to fix it:

  1. Open the PDF file in Inkscape and save it as an SVG file.  Yes, you’ve now got qs instead of os.  It will be ok.
  2. Close the file.
  3. Open the SVG in a text editor (I like Notepad++).
  4. Do a Find & Replace, finding “q” and replacing with “o”.  I recommend reviewing each instance it finds rather than using “replace all”, because one of those qs might be something else.  Here’s the general kind of text you’re looking for: id=”tspan4049″>q</tspan></text> See that q?  Change it to a o.
  5. Save the files and close.
  6. Open it up in Inkscape and see what you’ve got.

If anyone has a more elegant way to do this, let me know!  I’m sure there’s a way to change the R output from the start so you don’t have this problem, but this solution was quicker than messing with R for now.

All fixed!

All fixed!


Marxan Table Relationships

MarxanTables

Marxan is confusing.  There’s lots of pages of documentation and tutorials, but as a visual learner, all that text makes my head spin.  I find myself drawing pictures once I understand what’s going on so I can refer to them later.  The diagram above is a cleaned up, attractive, and cheerful rendition of the diagram I drew for myself on the whiteboard in my office (thank you, Inkscape, for having way more colors than I have for whiteboard markers).  The idea is taken from database diagrams.  The bold text is the table name and I put the recommended file name under it for easy reference.  The list beneath this is the column names for each file.  The lines connect columns with data that match (primary keys and whatnot).  So there you have it.  Maybe later I’ll post a new version with more notes about each file.  Let me know if that would be helpful.