Inkscape for Applique Sewing Patterns

Inkscape is a vector illustration program so most people think of it as an art program for producing slick graphics.  But it’s a really useful tool for planning an preparing for other art forms.  For example, I’ve been using it for sewing.  What?  Yes, sewing.  It’s incredibly useful for drawing patterns.  Recently I’ve been working on a needle turn applique quilt based on the work of Charley Harper, but for the past few years I’ve made felt Christmas ornaments for friends and family, for all of which I used Inkscape to draw the patterns.

If you’re familiar with Inkscape already, making applique patterns will be pretty straight forward. If you’re new to the program, I highly recommend working through a couple of tutorials.  Here’s my general workflow (yours may differ):

  1. Start with an image.  On Pinterest, great projects abound, but sometimes the post links to costly instructions, or no pattern at all.  I’ve also found things that I like the look of, but are a different scale – too big or too small.  Or, as with my latest project, I’m creating my own pattern pieces from an image.  Look for images with distinct polygons of colors.  Blended or faded areas are going to be harder to duplicate with applique unless you can find fabric with the right fade or you dye your own.
  2. Put the image into an Inkscape file and resize it to the size you want your final project to be.
  3. Draw polygons around each of the colors you see in your image.  You’ll want to think about how you’ll put the whole thing together as you trace, so think about how the layers will work together.  For example, if you have polka-dots, you’ll want to place the circles on top of a larger background color, not have a section of background color with holes cut out like Swiss cheese.

    Cat_PatternMaking

    Start by tracing out all of the sections you’ll need to cut from various colors of fabric.

  4. Start a new Inkscape file and make the size of the page whatever size you plan to print.  For those in the US, you’ll probably want US Letter Size.
  5. Copy your polygons from the first file and past them into the second.  (I find keeping both files is helpful later for placement of the pieces.)  Arrange all your polygons on the page so that none overlap.  For larger projects, I’ve made several files. If the same shape shows up multiple times in your pattern, for example maybe eyes or ears, you only need to include that shape once.

    Cat_PatternPieces

    One of 3 pages of pattern pieces for a larger work with many pieces.

  6. On each piece, I like to print the color of the fabric I plan to use and how many of this piece I need to cut out.
  7. If you have a really big pattern piece that’s bigger than your printable page size, there’s a solution.  Put the big pieces into one Inkscape file, then size the page to the content, giving it a reasonable margin for your printer.  Then save the file as a PDF.  Open the PDF and in the print options, pick Poster (or similar setting).  It will divide up the pattern into printable pages.  Then you can tape the pages together before you cut out the pattern.

    Cat_BigPieces

    My printer settings have an option to print large PDFs in pieces.  Yours probably has something similar.  Super useful for printing larger pattern pieces.

Bonus! Now when you’re placing your pieces, some stuff you can just eyeball and it will be fine.  In some situations though you might need to be more precise.  Because you have your original pattern tracing in Inkscape, you can go back to that file and measure the distance between items.  I set my units to inches and draw a line, then see how long my line is.  Super simple, but very effective.

Measure

The red line measures how long the vertical eye whisker is.

See the finished piece on a previous blog post.

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About micheletobias

I lead two lives - one as an artist and the other as a scientist. More and more I'm finding my two worlds colliding, and it's not the disaster you might expect. View all posts by micheletobias

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